Sinharaja Rain Forest

Sinharaja Forest Reserve is a national park and a biodiversity hotspot in Sri Lanka. It is of international significance and has been designated a Biosphere Reserve and World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

San Francisco Sky Line

Owl, Sinharajaya

Known to be the “Pearl of the Indian Ocean” Sri Lanka becomes an ideal destination for not only her beaches and so on, but also because of her curious wild life sites where among Sinharaja stands with pride. Being a national park and a biodiversity hotspot, it is of international significance and has been designated a Biosphere Reserve and World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Holding fame as a treasure trove of endemic species including trees, insects, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, Sinharaja is consisted of 26 endemic birds, the 20 rainforest species, including the elusive red-faced Malkoha, Green-billed Coucal and Sri Lanka Blue Magpie whereas there are about 3 elephants and 15 or so leopards are rarely seen. An interesting phenomenon is that birds tend to move in mixed feeding flocks, led by the fearless greater racket-tailed drongo and the noisy orange-billed babbler where the most common larger mammal is the endemic purple faced Langur. Reptiles include the endemic Green Pit Viper and Hump-nosed Vipers, and there exists a large variety of amphibians, especially tree frogs while invertebrates include the endemic common Bird Wing Butterfly and the inevitable leeches.

Spanning an area of 18900 acres, the forest is shrouded by copious rain clouds that replenish its deep soils and balance water resources for much of Southwestern Sri Lanka. The best-kept secret in Asia, Sinharaja, is one of the least disturbed and biologically unique lowland rainforests of Sri Lanka, where one could enjoy a moment along slippery trails pointing out the wealth of stunning plant, bird and animal life.